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Becoming a Judge in Alaska: The Judicial Selection Process Explained


Total Credits: 1.5 including 1.0 General, 0.5 Ethics

Average Rating:
   3.9
Category:
Off the Record
Faculty:
Chief Justice Joel Bolger |  Aimee Anderson Oravec |  Matthew Christian |  Bethany Harbison |  Kari McCrea |  Philip Shanahan |  Susanne Dipietro |  Lori Brownlee
License:
Never expires.


Description

Becoming a Judge in Alaska: The Judicial Selection Process Explained

1.0 General CLE Credits and .5 Ethics CLE Credit

Registration: Free of Charge | CLE# 2020-040


Sponsored by the Alaska Judicial Council

 

Presenters:

Chief Justice Joel Bolger, Alaska Supreme Court, and Chair of the

Alaska Judicial Council (moderator)

Aimee Oravec, former AJC member

Judge Matthew Christian, Fairbanks District Court

Judge Bethany Harbison, Alaska Court of Appeals

Judge Kari McCrea, Anchorage District Court

Phil Shanahan, Bar Counsel, Alaska Bar Association

Susanne DiPietro, AJC Executive Director

 

This program features a panel of attorneys and judges who will share their experiences with the merit selection process in Alaska. Topics will include the application packet, ethical conduct for judicial applicants, the Judicial Council interview, the Bar survey, and what to expect as a sitting judge. This program will be useful to attorneys considering a judicial application, and to all members of the Bar to better understand their role in Alaska’s merit judicial selection process.

 

Intended Outcomes/Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the program, participants will:

  • Understand how to prepare for the merit judicial selection process;
  • How to participate in the merit selection process, including the need to encourage well qualified and diverse individuals to apply, responding to the Bar survey consistent with ARPC 8.2, and serving as a reference for an applicant;
  • Understand ethical rules governing the conduct of judicial applicants, including how applicants should conduct themselves on social media and in public;
  • Differentiate between the perceptions of the judicial role and the reality.

Handouts

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